Monday, January 16, 2017

A Simple MFL-ES8 interface



So, if you read my latest Cycling '74 review, you'll know I'm pretty knocked out by the Expert Sleepers' ES-8 interface. Of course, I had to start coding for it as soon as possible. While I'm doing all sorts of stuff within Max (as described in the article), I'm also using it as my modular interface from Ableton Live.

So, rather than just keep it to myself, I quickly slapped together a Max for Live device that uses the same technique as in the article, but also provides a 'mono mode' to properly handle note allocation within a monophonic modular context. The result is the simplest direct CV way to interface a modular to Live (i.e., no MIDI-to-CV devices, no scaling or calibration hassles).

You can get this device from my github repo:
https://github.com/darwingrosse/ES-8-MFL-Interface

I did three tracks with this over the weekend, including part of the theme music for the weekend's podcast (with Joshua Eustis of Telefon Tel Aviv). Completely solid, man!

[ddg]

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Spilling my ES-8 Beans



Man, I've wanted to talk about this here!

I got an Expert Sleepers' ES-8, and just wrote up a long-ish review on it for the Cycling '74 newsletter. tl;dr is 'I love it, and you can't wrest it out of my hands!'

You can read the review here: https://cycling74.com/2017/01/03/review-expert-sleepers-es-8-interface

I also got a chance to do a bit of a review on SpektroAudio's CV Toolkit, which is a pretty perfect pairing with this device. Loving the hell out of it, and am anxious for future versions where audio input will also be included (meaning that I can pull 'CV' back into the package for even more mayhem).

So, right now, I'm lovin' life!

[ddg]


Monday, December 26, 2016

Yeah. OK. This.


This is the kind of thing that I like to do. That you should do. That John Keston prods us to do.

Everything should go through this process, and I'm about to get into it with my newfound love for messing with the Live API.

I've got to start spending more time at John's site: The Audio Cookbook

[ddg]

Saturday, December 17, 2016

So I Have to Post it Here so I Don't Lose It...


Love the web! Hate the web!

Love it because every day I find something that charms and/or excites me. Hate it because I never can find the thing that charmed/excited me yesterday. Maybe that's the point of this blog - it's like a Flickr account for my happy sites?

Anyway, Tom Whitwell (MusicThing dude) has written one of the best creativity articles for 2016, and it's all about Python code. Actually, it's a way of thinking about using Python code to get out of your own way, out of your head and into making some music. It includes the source, and it runs pretty much out of the box on everything that I have laying around in my house.

Since I already had trouble finding it today, I decided to share it here - and now I'll know how to get at it!

After yesterday's long drive into Madison, a great (but sparsely attended) performance and a coughing-fits evening, I think I'm ready for something like this. It's also probably the impetus that I need to fire up my newly learned React coding poo-pile and get making my own graphical score generator. But the roadmap provided by this posting is awesome.

Thanks Tom!

[ddg]

Edit: I did this using React and Bootstrap - check it out at this link! And let me know if you want the source (which will eventually end up in Github at some point...).

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Distraction...


This week is already chuck full of distractions. First, I had a great interview with Lippold Haken (designer/creator of the Haken Continuum) on the Art + Music + Technology podcast and have been dealing with the popularity of that one. I'm always glad when a podcast hits the mark. I also got in an Expert Sleepers' ES-8 that I'm working with for a series of article in the Cycling '74 newsletter (if you aren't subscribed, you should do it here). 

But the biggest distraction comes from the latest Web Audio Weekly newsletter from Chris Lowis, which introduced me to the WebAudio Designer by g200kg (pictured above). We've all been hearing about the Web Audio API, but getting into it is a bit of an eyepoke - and it seems to be in constant flux. Along comes WAD, and now playing/experimenting is about as easy as you can imagine.

Think of this as a sandbox to find out what the Web Audio world is capable of - and you will find yourself amazed at the level of coolness that can come squirting out of your browser. And, since it is modular in nature, it sort of fits may how-do-I-work philosophy. Whee!

[ddg]

Thursday, December 8, 2016

The Hits Keep On Comin'



Just got a note from my friend Stephen Taylor. It appears that microtonalist Erv Wilson has left our mortal coil. Erv was that intriguing inventor that clearly had an inner voice that spoke strongly, and and soul that listened carefully.

Stephen put together a kind of trippy overview of his work which you can check out here:

https://vimeo.com/29632431

A group of people also collaborated on an iOS app that provides access to many of the Wilson-driven microtonal explorations with some very helpful diagrams. You can check that out here:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wilsonic/id848852071?mt=8

Microtonal music is an area that few choose to explore, but those that do often find a new voice for their work. If this hasn't been an area of interest for you, maybe you can consider this a gentle nudge in that direction...

[ddg]

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Take. A. Breath.

Well, the effect of the weekend has me floored. I was gonna do something about the Monome modules, but I need to take a breath.

If you haven't listened to my latest podcast with Geert Bevin, you might want to check it out here:




Or maybe you'd prefer a nice distracting movie?


Let's relax a bit, then I'll come back to you on those sequencing modules...

[ddg]